Celebrating the 20th Annual National Poetry Month (Giveaway!)

April is National Poetry Month, a celebration of the writing craft that often speaks most directly to the heart and soul of life.

Poetry is language at its most distilled and most powerful. – Rita Dove

There are plenty of ways for children and parents (and aunts and uncles!) to take part in the celebration – from reading and writing poetry together to attending local readings and events. And don’t forget, April 21st is Poem in Your Pocket Day!

Here are just a few books of poetry that you might like to try reading with your kids.


Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems
Selected by Paul B. Janeczko
Illustrated by Melissa Sweet
Published by Candlewick (March 11, 2014)
Ages 6-9


Hi, Koo!: A Year of Seasons
by Jon J. Muth
Published by Scholastic Press (February 25, 2014)
Ages 4-8


A Child’s Garden of Verses
by Robert Louis Stevenson
Originally published in 1885
Reissue Edition published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (February 1, 1999)
Illustrated by Tasha Tudor


The Random House Book of Poetry for Children
Selected by Jack Prelutsky
Illustrated by Arnold Lobel
Published by Random House (September 12, 1983)
Ages 7 and up


Poetry for Young People: Robert Frost
Edited by Gary D. Schmidt
Illustrated by Henri Sorensen
Published by Sterling Children’s Books, New edition (March 4, 2014)
Ages 8 and up


Poems to Learn by Heart
by Caroline Kennedy
Paintings by Jon J. Muth
Published by Disney-Hyperion (March 26, 2013)

Giveaway! [Update: this giveaway has ended. Stay tuned for more giveaways in future posts]
Some books are too good not to be shared, so I’m giving away 2 copies of Poems to Learn by Heart through an Amazon giveaway. Click here for your chance to win. Good luck everyone!

FTC Required Disclosure: This blog features Amazon Associate links, including linked images. Purchases made through these affiliate links will result in a my receiving a small commission. This applies to all products purchased at Amazon through the link, regardless of whether or not I’ve mentioned the product on this blog.

Review: The Almost Terrible Playdate


The Almost Terrible Playdate
by Richard Torrey
Published by Doubleday Books for Young Readers (February 16, 2016)
Ages 3 – 7

My Rating: 3 Stars

Review:
The Almost Terrible Playdate starts with an oft asked question among children, “What do you want to play?” Two friends begin formulating ideas about their own ideal pretend play, and as they do they inevitably disagree on what to do. In imaginative thought bubbles we see the girl wanting to be characters that are the most important and powerful, and we see the boy wanting to dominate his stories. Typical behavior for both kids and some adults. Aren’t we all the main character in our own minds? After retreating to separate play areas, the two friends, thanks to curiosity, organically manage to compromise. Who says one story can’t have a ballerina, a circus, a dragon, a race car and a zoo?

The conflict in The Almost Terrible Playdate is cleverly portrayed on the cover with opposing crayon illustrations in opposing colors – a technique that is carried throughout the story. The cover art and the entire story are very accessible. It’s easy for even the youngest ages to understand what is happening from the illustrations. For parents, it may even seem like they’re looking at a slice of their own children’s play experiences. It is a humorous view of two children riding the emotional wave from stubbornness and selfishness to curiosity to compromise.

The reason I am giving an average 3 out of 5 star rating is because it is heavily gender stereotyped. Does it ring true that the girl wants things like Queens, ballerinas and ponies in her story? Does it ring true that the boy wants dinosaurs and race cars in his story? Of course it does. And that’s partially what makes the book accessible. But which comes first – the boy who likes cars and the girl who likes ponies or the images and messages that they receive from parents, TV and books about what they are supposed to like? The conflict in the story would have been just as poignant had the girl wanted to be an astronaut and the boy wanted to be a zoo keeper. With so many gender neutral combinations that would work just as well to tell the tale, there was a lot of room here to push the envelope. While the story provides a realistic view into the world of pretend play and offers a way for teachers and parents to easily introduce kids to the concept of cooperation, it’s a bit too conventional for my taste.

FTC Required Disclosure: This blog features Amazon Associate links, including linked images. Purchases made through these affiliate links will result in a my receiving a small commission. This applies to all products purchased at Amazon through the link, regardless of whether or not I’ve mentioned the product on this blog.

Review: Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast


Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast
by Josh Funk
Illustrated by Brendan Kearney
Published by Sterling Children’s Books (September 1, 2015)
Ages 5+

My Rating: 5 Stars

Review:
Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast by Josh Funk is set to be released on Tuesday, September 1st. I unwittingly stumbled upon my “advance copy” at the local bookstore over the weekend. The cover art is what caught my eye. It was also hard to ignore the delicious title that said, “Hey, I’m going to be funny. Pick me up.”

Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast, the best of pals, are hanging out in the fridge when along comes their neighbor, Miss Brie. She tells them there is only one drop of syrup left. Suddenly, the best pals begin to race each other to the bottle of syrup – leaping over beets, getting stuck in chili, climbing up celery and scrambling through the fridge to reach the coveted last drop of syrup. Will competition destroy Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast’s friendship?

Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast is very entertaining. The fast-paced race to the finish line moves the story quickly, and the rhyming text, with antics at every page turn, is a pleasure to read. The illustrations are colorful, quirky and delightful.

In the end, a lesson in sharing is learned, but how they learn it is too fun for me to give away.

Goodreads Giveaway: If you go to the Goodreads page for Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast between now and August 31st, you can enter to win a copy of the book.

FTC Required Disclosure: This blog features Amazon Associate links, including linked images. Purchases made through these affiliate links will result in a my receiving a small commission. This applies to all products purchased at Amazon through the link, regardless of whether or not I’ve mentioned the product on this blog. All reviews are my own opinion. I am not paid in any other form to write reviews.