Review: PIRASAURS!


Pirasaurs!
by Josh Funk
Illustrations by Michael Slack
Published by Orchard Books, an imprint of Scholastic (August 30, 2016)
Ages 3-5

My rating: 5 Stars

Review:

Imagine you’re the smallest and newest member of a raucous crew of Cretaceous corsairs. That’s right, you’re a little dinosaur and you want to be a pirate. You try and try, but to no avail. Then, one day you lead the way and deliver not only gold and jewels to your pack of prehistoric picaroons, but peace with a rival ship of seafaring dinos.

This is the kind of delightful tale you get from masterful storytellers like Josh Funk. Pirasaurs! is one of two new picture books from Josh Funk that were recently released just a few days apart (Dear Dragon: A Pen Pal Tale is the other). With lively rhythm and rhyme, Josh introduces us to zany characters, such as Captain Rex and her “fabled sword” and Triceracook, whose food makes the crew “slurp and belch and burp.” It’s an imaginative story that’s sure to satisfy the most rambunctious crowds.

Real magic happens when you are able to combine a fun-to-read story that has a heart with colorful, expressive illustrations. Josh Funk and Michael Slack have created a sea-worthy vessel for little ones to explore themes like perseverance and cooperation. And, the journey is so fun, they won’t even know it.

Is your crew ready for a boisterous adventure with marauders from the Mesozoic Era? “Come join the Pirasaurs!

What else has Josh Funk written?


Check out my review of Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast here.

FTC Required Disclosure: This blog features Amazon Associate links, including linked images. Purchases made through these affiliate links will result in a my receiving a small commission. This applies to all products purchased at Amazon through the link, regardless of whether or not I’ve mentioned the product on this blog.

Review: The Almost Terrible Playdate


The Almost Terrible Playdate
by Richard Torrey
Published by Doubleday Books for Young Readers (February 16, 2016)
Ages 3 – 7

My Rating: 3 Stars

Review:
The Almost Terrible Playdate starts with an oft asked question among children, “What do you want to play?” Two friends begin formulating ideas about their own ideal pretend play, and as they do they inevitably disagree on what to do. In imaginative thought bubbles we see the girl wanting to be characters that are the most important and powerful, and we see the boy wanting to dominate his stories. Typical behavior for both kids and some adults. Aren’t we all the main character in our own minds? After retreating to separate play areas, the two friends, thanks to curiosity, organically manage to compromise. Who says one story can’t have a ballerina, a circus, a dragon, a race car and a zoo?

The conflict in The Almost Terrible Playdate is cleverly portrayed on the cover with opposing crayon illustrations in opposing colors – a technique that is carried throughout the story. The cover art and the entire story are very accessible. It’s easy for even the youngest ages to understand what is happening from the illustrations. For parents, it may even seem like they’re looking at a slice of their own children’s play experiences. It is a humorous view of two children riding the emotional wave from stubbornness and selfishness to curiosity to compromise.

The reason I am giving an average 3 out of 5 star rating is because it is heavily gender stereotyped. Does it ring true that the girl wants things like Queens, ballerinas and ponies in her story? Does it ring true that the boy wants dinosaurs and race cars in his story? Of course it does. And that’s partially what makes the book accessible. But which comes first – the boy who likes cars and the girl who likes ponies or the images and messages that they receive from parents, TV and books about what they are supposed to like? The conflict in the story would have been just as poignant had the girl wanted to be an astronaut and the boy wanted to be a zoo keeper. With so many gender neutral combinations that would work just as well to tell the tale, there was a lot of room here to push the envelope. While the story provides a realistic view into the world of pretend play and offers a way for teachers and parents to easily introduce kids to the concept of cooperation, it’s a bit too conventional for my taste.

FTC Required Disclosure: This blog features Amazon Associate links, including linked images. Purchases made through these affiliate links will result in a my receiving a small commission. This applies to all products purchased at Amazon through the link, regardless of whether or not I’ve mentioned the product on this blog.

Review: By Mouse & Frog


By Mouse & Frog
by Deborah Freedman
Published by Viking Books for Young Readers (April 14, 2015)
Age 3-5

My Rating: 4 Stars

Review:
What happens when two friends or two siblings are complete opposites? How do they relate? When one is quiet and careful and the other is rambunctious and unfettered, it’s not always easy for them to get along, but sometimes opposites come together to create a real friendship.

One morning, Mouse wakes up and starts writing a story. As Mouse begins, Frog bounces onto the scene, wanting to help. Frog wildly adds kings and dragons and melting ice cream to Mouse’s story, which had barely begun. When it all turns to chaos, it is just too much for Mouse. Mouse explodes and shouts at Frog. Frog is hurt, but they manage a truce. Mouse begins the story again. This time Mouse finally gets to the part where Frog is part of the story, but that’s not enough for Frog. Frog aches to add elements to the story. Mouse obliges, but makes suggestions to keep things a little more down-to-earth. Together they create a colorful, magical story they are both happy with.

By Mouse & Frog explores themes like cooperation and mutual respect in a way that is natural. The dialogue between Frog and Mouse sounds a lot like how real children talk when they’re playing together, yet in a structured story. Anyone with multiple children will see their most wild, free-spirited child in Frog and their most subdued, restrained child in Mouse. The text is subtly humorous, and the illustrations are soft and endearing. Mouse and Frog are the kind of relatable, charming characters that would be good in a series (think Frog and Toad for younger kids), but unless the author has plans for this, we’ll just have to be content with this delightful story about two friends learning to play nicely with each other in order to create a masterpiece.

FTC Required Disclosure: This blog features Amazon Associate links, including linked images. Purchases made through these affiliate links will result in a my receiving a small commission. This applies to all products purchased at Amazon through the link, regardless of whether or not I’ve mentioned the product on this blog.